Hannah M

 

Mt. Holly, NC

Injury Level: C4
Injury Date: 7/20/2007

 

 

On the afternoon of July 20, 2007, I was injured in a single car accident. Having sustained an explosive fracture of the C4 vertebrae and severe damage to the spinal cord, I was left with a complete spinal cord injury at the age of 18.  After having surgery at Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte and spending a week in their Trauma Unit, I was airlifted to the Shepherd Center in Atlanta where I was a patient for three months.

Physical therapy was started even before I was weaned off the ventilator at six weeks post injury.  Upon returning home, I began a desperate search for rehabilitation. Unable to find anything locally, I went to Project Walk in California twice.  Their program offered me hope.

Working out is a major focus in my life. Having danced six days a week prior to my accident, I knew about hard work.  Mentally, I was ready for the challenge.

When I heard about the opening of Race to Walk, I immediately called and became one of the first three clients.  Although my progress has been slow, the most important thing for me is that there has been some progress.

Without a doubt my long term goal is to dance and to walk again. I graduated UNC Charlotte in 2012 with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Criminal Justice. Iam now attending Wake Forrest and will graduate this May with a Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. 

Being paralyzed from the neck down does not stop me from enjoying life.  I love hanging out with my friends and family.  Teaching dance, eating at my favorite restaurants, going to concerts and riding the jet ski are among my pleasures.  Although I long for the day when I can walk again, I am happy with what I have.


 

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"I don't even remember what I did with my life before I found Race to Walk. When I was 23, I had a spontaneous brain stem stroke and locked-in syndrome which left me completely paralyzed from head to toe. Soon after, the local rehab hospital ran out [...]"
— Harshada
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